A02-1

A02-1 Variations and interactions of climate and the Antarctic Ice Sheet
The Role
We analyze ice cores, and perform in-situand satellite observations to investigate the past and present of the Antarctic Ice Sheet and global climate. The goal of our study is to better understand the mechanisms driving the variations and interactions of the ice sheet and climate.
We focus on the reconstructionof temperature, snow accumulation, sea ice, and carbon cycles over the past several hundred thousand years, as well asthe observations of the ice sheet mass balance and icesheet-ocean interaction.
Research overview
We analyze ice cores drilled at Dome Fuji to reconstruct Antarctic and global environmental changes. Thefocusesof the analysisare: (1) carbon dioxide concentration asthe input of ice sheets and climate models, (2) water isotopes and noble gas for the reconstruction of temperature and seawater temperature, (3) aerosols related to the radiative forcing and material circulation, (4) sea-ice derived materials (5) methane concentration for the reconstruction of climate instability, (6) air content as an indicator of ice sheet elevation change, and (7) various components for more accurate FWith a special focus on the “super warm period”, when the Antarctic Ice Sheet receded, we performa comparative study using numerical models and deep sea coresin collaboration with the paleoceanography and the modellinggroup.  We also studythe formation processof paleoenvironmental signals
We measurethe flow speed and mass change of the ice sheet based onin-situ observations and remote sensing techniques.Mass balance and ice loss are quantified in coastal areas as well as over anentiredrainage basinto understandthe mechanism of glacier acceleration, ice-shelf basal melting, and grounding line migration in collaboration with the bottom water and the solid earth research groups.  In collaboration with the modelling group, wecontribute to the refinement of ice sheet models, and more accuratefuture projection of the ice sheet volume and sea level rise.